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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
: where was the rover built? >> it was built here at jpl. we had lots of partners all over the world too, where the science missions have been donated by foreign countries. >> bill: did you do -- the launch -- or the landing, was so perfect. did you do any practice runs like -- i'm just curious, like in the desert or anything? >> there has been an extensive testing of everything on here instruments, landing. you name it we have tested it. i don't know if they did a full end-to-end testing. i would have to ask one of the landing engineers. >> bill: but certainly all of the instruments and cameras, was all tested. >> yes, we have continuing to test even today. we're doing extensive testing on the drilling and arm, and we'll continue to test all through the mission. >> bill: let me ask you what have we learned so far? >> we have learned that we have landed in a very exciting place. this mission is not -- unlike anything else we have ever flown. it's very, very complex. it has more instruments more things to do than anything we have put down on the surface of the planet. we
, there is a bit of a peanut tradition. please explain. >> well, at jpl, you know, with a nearly 50-year record of unbelievable planetary exploration, about 40 years ago the tradition began of opening peanuts when a keen event in planetary exploration began. we passed the peanuts around for good luck right before opportunity landed. and of course some of the pebbles under the rover deck remind us of those peanuts so it's all a good thing. >> and also, mohawk guy. cnn talked to him just yesterday. let's roll the sound. >> the thought that in some way of kids and other people that are motivated to come work here because they see me and they say, that guy can put stuff on mars, maybe i can too, i would like to say it takes all types to make these missions work. >> have you been just overwhelmed by the excitement? and i'm not just talking about his mohawk, but the whole deep space exploration, really just this outpouring in the last couple of days i'm sure globally. what does that mean for you and nasa? >> well, it means so much for all of us, because this is an 11-year journey. the engineers at jp
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
billion or more a piece have largely paid back the money. can you name some of the major banks? guest: jpl morgan, citibank -- j.p. morgan, citibank, goldman sachs paid back tarp. initially, $125 billion was given to the largest banks and it quickly paid back. host: and banks worth less than $10 billion a piece, and moneys outstanding versus what they paid back. what is it about the smaller banks giving them a harder time? guest: a lot of the smaller banks are not as healthy as the big banks. they also don't have easy access to the capital market, so it is harder for them to go out and raise capital to pay it back. host: here is a piece that you wrote for bloomberg a couple of weeks ago. the u.s. treasury department said it started selling stakes today -- first of all, why get out of it? why is of the treasury department trying to extricate itself from these banks? guest: hutras reece says it was never intended to be a lifelong shareholder of banks, so it was natural they would eventually get out. i think they are realistic probably will not do with this year. and probably will continue in
you. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> abbottabad in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after injury. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was a damage or not. so t
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
us do it to request this wee. >> hubert humphrey. on c-span3. >> now nasa engineers at the jpl in california give an update on the mars rover curiosity mission. they talk about the space craft landing on mars earlier this week and show pictures. this is about an hour and 10 minutes. >> welcome to the jp el. we are holding our finalists conference for the week. -- our final conference this we. >> this week, we have had a tremendous success in landing on mars and the beginning of the exploration of a new world. we're going to hear from a senior software engineer who will give us a preview of what's coming up in the next few days for the rover. first, we're going to hear from the descent and landing team. they have been poring over the data and have some new details for us. first, i want to introduce the lead, adam, and his deputy, miguel san martin. >> thank you, veronica. we have a talented panel here for you today. miguel and i wanted to be the ones to introduce them to you. leading off the rotation, the operations lead for descent and landing. from the johnson space flight cen
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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